Hip and knee surgeries

Victoria hospital offers innovative same-day hip and knee replacement surgery

Dr. Duncan Jacks has created a committee to expand the VERA program to other types of surgery at Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria in the near future. (Submitted by the Vancouver Island Health Authority)

Under the new protocols, patients can leave the hospital a few hours after their operation

Adam van der Zwan · CBC News · Posted: Sep 02, 2020

[Excerpt] Seventy-one-year-old Dan Kelly says he was in disbelief when he left the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria three hours after a total hip replacement.

“I did a little jig right after I got off the bed,” he recounted. “I walked about 30 feet to the bathroom. That was just an hour after my surgery. It was unbelievable.”

By noon he felt good enough to go home.

Kelly is one of eight trial patients who’ve had hip or knee replacement surgery under Island Health’s new Victoria Enhanced Recovery Arthroplasty (VERA) program, over the past year. 

Lead orthopedic surgeon Dr. Duncan Jacks says hip and knee replacements are in high demand, and the program involves a new way of controlling pain and anesthesia before, during and after surgery, to drastically improve patient recovery. 

Under the new protocols, patients who are “reasonably healthy” are given a number of medications before their operation “to target all the different pain pathways … before the pain sets in,” said Jacks.

Patients are also injected with anesthetic into the epidural space outside the spinal fluid, rather than into the fluid directly, “allowing the patient’s motor-function to recover almost immediately.” 

Jacks said his team is also trying to minimize soft tissue damage through different cutting techniques, and is using specialized sutures and dressing materials to minimize drainage from surgical wounds.

Full article at: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/victoria-hospital-knee-replacement-surgery-1.5708750

BC Primary Health Care Research Network

https://spor-bcphcrn.ca

The BC Primary Health Care Research Network (BC-PHCRN) is one of 11 Strategy for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations (PIHCI) networks in Canadian provinces/territories, designed to support evidence-informed transformation of the delivery of primary and integrated health care.

The goal of the BC-PHCRN is to encourage, facilitate, and support collaborations between government, health authorities, health professionals, patients and researchers. The BC-PHCRN aims to seek out, develop, and facilitate adoption of health care innovations to improve BC’s health care delivery system.

The BC-PHCRN is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR).

Follow us on Twitter @BC_PHCRN or email us at info@spor-bcphcrn.ca.

HOME SUPPORT – Seniors Advocate

Click on the first page and scroll down, or click on https://www.seniorsadvocatebc.ca/app/uploads/sites/4/2019/06/Report-Home-Support-Review_web.pdf

https://www.seniorsadvocatebc.ca/app/uploads/sites/4/2019/06/Report-Home-Support-Review_web.pdf

“Throughout the past five years, I have heard from tens of thousands of seniors about the issues that matter to them, and indeed the wants, hopes, dreams and aspirations of those who are 65 or older are as diverse as the people themselves. However, if there is one issue where seniors hold a near-unanimous opinion, it is in their desire to live independently, in their own home, for as long as possible.

No matter what our age, living independently requires the ability to find safe, affordable housing and the capability to complete the tasks necessary to care for ourselves and our surroundings. As we age, some of us will experience some challenges with everyday tasks we once could do ourselves and we will look to family and friends to help us out. Many of us will also turn to a professional type of help, often known as home support, to assist us.

The provincial home support program is a lifeline for many seniors in B.C. who would undoubtedly need to live in a long-term care facility if it were not for the assistance they receive with the personal care and medication management the program provides. However, when my office reviewed the current program to look at its overall effectiveness and whether it is meeting the needs of B.C.’s seniors, we found that it is falling short on many fronts.

Who is it serving, how well is it serving them, who is it not serving, why is it not serving them, and what are the overall consequences if the program is failing are the test questions we asked in relation to the B.C. home support program. To get the answers, we looked
at both qualitative and quantitative data. What we found was a program that, while meeting the needs of some seniors, was falling seriously short of the mark in meeting the needs of most seniors and, as a consequence, was creating overburdened family caregivers, prematurely placing seniors in long-term care, increasing lengths of stay in hospital, and unnecessarily costing taxpayers tens of millions of dollars each year that could be saved with an effective home support program.”

Home Support – Office of the Seniors Advocate BC

https://www.seniorsadvocatebc.ca/app/uploads/sites/4/2019/06/Report-Home-Support-Review_web.pdf

“Throughout the past five years, I have heard from tens of thousands of seniors about the issues that matter to them, and indeed the wants, hopes, dreams and aspirations of those who are 65 or older are as diverse as the people themselves. However, if there is one issue where seniors hold a near-unanimous opinion, it is in their desire to live independently, in their own home, for as long as possible.

No matter what our age, living independently requires the ability to find safe, affordable housing and the capability to complete the tasks necessary to care for ourselves and our surroundings. As we age, some of us will experience some challenges with everyday tasks we once could do ourselves and we will look to family and friends to help us out. Many of us will also turn to a professional type of help, often known as home support, to assist us.

The provincial home support program is a lifeline for many seniors in B.C. who would undoubtedly need to live in a long-term care facility if it were not for the assistance they receive with the personal care and medication management the program provides. However, when my office reviewed the current program to look at its overall effectiveness and whether it is meeting the needs of B.C.’s seniors, we found that it is falling short on many fronts.

Who is it serving, how well is it serving them, who is it not serving, why is it not serving them, and what are the overall consequences if the program is failing are the test questions we asked in relation to the B.C. home support program. To get the answers, we looked
at both qualitative and quantitative data. What we found was a program that, while meeting the needs of some seniors, was falling seriously short of the mark in meeting the needs of most seniors and, as a consequence, was creating overburdened family caregivers, prematurely placing seniors in long-term care, increasing lengths of stay in hospital, and unnecessarily costing taxpayers tens of millions of dollars each year that could be saved with an effective home support program.”

Healthcare Travelling Roadshow

The Healthcare Travelling Roadshow was conceived as a grass roots initiative to address rural healthcare workforce shortages. 

It involves a multidisciplinary group of health-care students from post-secondary institutions around B.C. travelling to rural communities to showcase career opportunities to high school students.

The idea is to inspire high school students that are from rural centres to become interested in careers in health care, with the hope that  they will come back to practice in their home town, or another small community.

Since its inception in 2010, the Healthcare Travelling Roadshow has connected with more than 10,500 high school students in 56 communities throughout BC.

 “Research nationwide tells us that students from a rural origin are more likely to settle in a rural location.” 

Dr. Sean Maurice, Senior Lab Instructor, at the University of Northern BC, is the person behind the Traveling Roadshow.
Sean.Maurice@unbc.ca 
http://www.unbc.ca/nmp/sean_maurice.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQ3dCFjKDiQ&feature=emb_title

For an online resource that shares some of the Roadshow, with personal stories of students representing a variety of different healthcare careers, click on https://www.unbc.ca/healthcare-travelling-roadshow/virtual-roadshow

Note: While UNBC covers Northern BC, for the Interior, contact Warren Brock warren.brock@ubc.ca  250-807-8601 or visit https://smp.med.ubc.ca/2020/01/17/2020-healthcare-travelling-roadshow/

The contact for Vancouver Island is Kurt McBurney at mcburney@uvic.ca

 



Action for Reform of Residential Care (ARRCBC) Association

http://arrcbc.ca/

We Are 

The Action for Reform of Residential Care (ARRCBC) Association is dedicated to promoting quality of life in long term care facilities in British Columbia through education and advocacy. The association is made of up clinicians, researchers, family members and other citizens concerned with the care provided in long-term care facilities. 

Our Goal

Our goal is a long term care system where residents are supported to live their lives as fully and joyfully as possible. 

We Believe

  • We believe that quality of life is important all across the lifespan
  • We believe that quality of life requires quality of care and both are non-negotiable
  • We believe that quality of care is closely linked to quality working conditions for care providers
  • We believe that that care is a relationship between those receiving and providing care and meaningful and sustainable relationships between seniors and care providers are imperative to quality of life
  • We believe that LTC facilities must support seniors’ health and well-being/mental health, enable them to stay as active as possible and to participate in meaningful activities and relationships
  • We believe the institutional model is dehumanizing and must be replaced by a person centred model of relational care

ARRCBC Chair: Dr. Penny MacCourt 

Dr. Penny MacCourt has a social work background and has worked with older adults in the community, long term care and acute care settings for many years as a clinical social worker. She holds a Bachelor and Masters of Social Work from University of Manitoba and a PhD (Interdisciplinary Studies) from University of Victoria. Her doctoral and post-doctoral studies have focused on aging, mental health and service delivery. She is a founding member of the BC Psychogeriatric Association and was appointed to the Seniors Advisory Committee to the Mental Health Commission of Canada. She is past Chair of the Social Policy and Practice Division of the Canadian Association on Gerontology. She received a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition of her contribution to Canada for her work with caregivers. Through practice, research, policy and advocacy, and in collaboration with others, her goal is to facilitate social environments (relationships, policy, services) that support seniors’ well being/mental health.

http://arrcbc.ca/Improving%20LTC%20full%20report.pdf

Join ARRCBC and support our advocacy:

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Action for Reform of Residential Care Association (ARRCBC) 

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Community Health Centres

What Are Community Health Centres?

Marcy Cohen/Andrew Longhurst
March 1, 2019

Community Health Centres (CHCs) have been an effective but under-valued model for delivering primary health care for decades in Canada and the US. 

One of the unique features of the model is its strong focus on the social determinants of health and preventing acute illness among groups who are more likely to experience poor health and suffer from chronic conditions, including low-income people, ethno-cultural communities, Indigenous peoples, and frail seniors. 

So what are community health centres? CHCs are non-profit primary care organizations that provide integrated health care and social services, with a focus on addressing the social determinants of health. Five commonly accepted characteristics include:

  1. CHCs provide team-based inter-professional primary care that includes a range of health care and social service providers, including social workers, family physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, dieticians, occupational therapists, clinical pharmacists, physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, cross-cultural health brokers, First Nations elders, mental health counsellors, and outreach workers, among others.
  2. CHCs integrate medical care, mental health and substance use services, health promotion and chronic disease management programs. Many CHCs also provide vision and dental care.
  3. CHCs are community-governed and responsive to the patients/members they serve. This means that they are legally established as non-profit societies or co-operatives and provide open membership to their patients (who are members of the organization). It also means that patient-members can participate on the board of directors and in other parts of the governance of the organization.
  4. CHCs actively address the social determinants of health such as poverty, access to housing, education, language barriers and other factors that have a direct impact on health. CHCs take an upstream approach intended to prevent illness and promote wellness.
  5. CHCs demonstrate commitment to health equity and social justice, and recognize that disparities in health status among the population are socially, economically, and institutionally structured—and that these disparities are avoidable and unfair. CHCs work to eliminate these health inequities through a community development approach and advocating for public policies that address the upstream determinants of health, including fair taxation, living wages, decent working conditions, safe and affordable housing and quality public services.

On February 1, 2019, the BC Health Coalition, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and Health Sciences Association of BC convened an invitational roundtable followed by a public talk in response to growing interest in the CHC model from communities across the province. That interest has also been taken up by government; in 2017, the NDP made an election campaign commitment to support the development of new (and existing) CHCs—a commitment that was re-affirmed in the new government’s May 2018 primary care directions.

Over 70 people from a broad range of community non-profit and health sector organizations participated in the roundtable including health professionals, immigrant and newcomer-serving organizations, the Ministry of Health, Divisions of Family Practice and Health Authority representatives, the First Nations Health Authority, seniors’ organizations, the BC Rural Health Network, and leaders from the CHC sector in BC. Participants heard how CHCs in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Oregon provide responsive, team-based primary care that is community-led and that has proven very effective in addressing the unmet needs of vulnerable populations as well as the broader neighbourhoods and communities where they are situated (audio available below).

As BC moves to support a role for CHCs within a larger agenda for reforming primary care, what can we learn from other jurisdictions where CHCs are integrated into the broader primary care system? How can we support CHCs in BC to be leaders in improving the quality of care for the entire health system?

Find out more by clicking on: The importance of community health centres in BC’s primary care reforms: What the research tells us. 

Marcy Cohen/Andrew Longhurst
March 1, 2019

DISCRIMINATION in HEALTHCARE

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